Kimbal Musk: We Can Get You Your Model 3 By End of Week

By Amanda Weston

Tesla ($TSLA) CEO Elon Musk has admitted the company was going through "delivery logistics hell" in getting its Model 3s out the door, but his younger brother Kimbal has faith he'll get the job done.

"I think that if you have a Model 3, and you'd like it delivered, we could probably get it done for you by the end of this week," Musk told Cheddar at Denver Startup Week. "So if we haven't reached out to you, reach out to us."

The 46-year-old who serves as a Tesla board member added, "Tesla's doing a great job. My brother's working hard. It's an exciting time. They're working hard to get it done."

Tesla has long-struggled to meet production goals on the mass-market Model 3, finally reaching his target of making 5,000 of the electric vehicles a week at the end of the second quarter. While the company appears to be on track to meet production this quarter, now the problem is getting the product to customers. Over the weekend Elon tweeted the company had built its own "car carriers" to help the process.

"I do know that the company is working very hard to focus on deliveries, and we want to respect all of the government process to make sure all the T's are crossed and I's are dotted, and we're doing all the right things," Kimbal Musk said.

As for whether the issue would be helped had his brother followed through on his plan to take the company private, Kimbal only said, "This particular business challenge wouldn't have been affected by that."

Elon Musk ultimately went back on the idea, and the company now faces investigations by the SEC and Justice Department over possibly misleading investors. Kimbal would not comment on any discussions the board was having around those probes.

But Kimbal Musk's responsibilities go far beyond Tesla and SpaceX, another company run by his brother and on whose board he serves as a director.

The serial entrepreneur's latest start-up, Next Door American Eatery, aims to put restaurant chains closer to their food sources and foster a relationship between farmers and buyers.

That gives him some insight into how trade tensions between China and the U.S. will affect the farming industry. To him, it's a matter of all the uncertainty that's created.

"As a buyer, we're consistently buying product from [farmers]. That builds that trusted relationship," he said.

"In the industrial food system, there is no relationship. You grow your food, and it gets put into a commodities market. And as a result those farmers are really struggling. Tariffs are just uncertain. That creates a lot of challenges for farmers."

For full interview click here.

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